This hearty braised beef shank recipe takes a classic comforting dinner and updates it with a modern cut for a fun appearance. We use a Thor’s Hammer beef shank, simmered in a red wine braising liquid with savory veggies and herbs for a fun update on a wholesome meal.

Braised beef shank with exposed bone, aka Thor's Hammer, set in a serving bowl with veggies.

In this recipe:

This easy beef shank recipe requires only several simple ingredients yet still offers a lot of taste. The braising process tenderizes the otherwise tough meat and adds significantly to its savory and rich sauce. Whether you’re braising lamb shanks or veal, this method is our tried and true favorite for infusing the biggest taste into the meal. For best results, pair this easy dinner recipe with mashed potatoes or vegetables.

If you’re feeling fancy, consider both. But to keep it low-carb, we recommend a parsnip or cauliflower puree.

What Is a Volcano Beef Shank, aka thor’s hammer?

Beef shank is a timeless cut for many old-school recipes made to feed a lot of people. Cut from the shank, leg portion of the cow, otherwise known as a cross cut shank, it’s a highly worked tough cut. Which makes it ideal for braising. And, it’s gotten a modern update, where the butcher has exposed the top part of the bone from the shank center cut and is marketing it as Thor’s Hammer or Volcano cut beef shank. It’s similar to osso buco meat but offers a more elaborate presentation.

If you aren’t familiar with osso buco (or ossobuco), it’s an Italian word for ‘bone with a hole,’ referencing the marrow hole of typically veal shanks. But can also be cut from pork, like in our savory pork osso buco.

Beef shanks, or any shank for that matter, is a tough cut of meat, and is riddled with connective tissue and silverskin that needs to break down in order for the meat to become tender and enjoyable. But when you cook them properly, like with a low and slow braise, every bite is full of rich beefy flavor.

Beef shanks where the bone has been trimmed and exposed add a depth of flavor from the bone marrow that will render as the beef braises.

Beef Shank Ingredients

  • Bone-in beef shank – beef cross cut shank with the bone Frenched for show or traditional beef shank bone
  • Salt – we always use kosher salt
  • Carrots – roughly cut into large chunks
  • Onion – chopped into large wedges
  • Fresh Garlic cloves
  • Pepper – freshly crushed black pepper
  • GirlCarnivore Over Easy – or your favorite robust herb mix, like Italian seasoning
  • Tomato paste
  • Red Wine – use a dry red wine you’d be happy to drink later. If you want, you can substitute beef stock, but we find the flavor not as robust.
  • Fresh Thyme sprigs
  • Fresh Rosemary sprigs 

How To Cook Beef Shank

The goal is to cook this low and slow to an internal temp of 200 to 205 degrees F to break down all the tough connective tissue. It will be tender meat that shreds easily but still has a little tug from the bone. Let’s break it down:

Salted beef shank.

Prep the beef shank

  • Lower the oven rack to the lower mid level and preheat the oven as instructed in the recipe card at the bottom of this post.
  • Trim excess fat from beef shank as needed. Secure with butcher’s twine along the circumference and season liberally on all sides with salt. Securing it simply helps to retain the shape for the finished dish presentation. If you aren’t concerned about this, you could skip this step.
  • Preheat a large dutch oven over medium heat and add canola oil to the large pot. 
  • Place the beef shank in and sear on all sides, using tongs to rotate the shank as needed for up to ten minutes—then set aside.
  • Reduce the heat and add carrots, onion, garlic, tomato paste, salt, and GirlCarnivore Over Easy spice blend to the roasting pan.
  • Deglaze the pan with wine using caution as it will bubble and steam. 
  • Using a wooden spoon, scrape up any browned bits on the bottom. Slowly add the remaining wine and bring to a simmer. 
  • Tie the rosemary and thyme sprigs together and add them to the pot. 
  • Remove from heat or stove top. 

Braise the beef shank 

  • Add shank back to pot. Cook as instructed in the recipe card, covered, occasionally rotating the meat to evenly cook all sides and basting it with the red wine sauce. 

Rest and Serve

  • Carefully remove the pot from the oven. Using tongs, set the beef shank on a cutting board, tenting with foil to rest. Carefully remove the rosemary and thyme from the red wine sauce. 
  • Shred the beef from the bone and ladle the accumulated juices over top or serve large chunks individually with a knife and fork to allow individuals to cut. 
  • Garnish with a pinch of fresh thyme sprigs, lemon zest, minced fresh parsley, salt and pepper to serve. 
Hands shredding cooked meat from the bone.

EXPERT RECIPE TIPS

  • Braised beef shanks pair wonderfully with classic polenta, creamy mashed potatoes, or risotto. For low-carb diets, we recommend roasted parsnips or cauliflower puree.
  • When the beef is resting, you can add additional blanched carrots to the sauce if needed, brighter color and texture for serving. 

Leftovers & Reheating

Store leftover beef shank, shredded from the bone, in an airtight container or double-wrapped tightly in plastic and stored in the refrigerator. If stored properly, you can reheat the beef shank up to three days later.

To reheat, preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Place the beef shank, wrapped in foil, in the preheated oven and bake for up to 15 minutes—or until cooked through.

What to Serve With 

Beef Shank FAQs

Are beef shanks expensive?

One of the best things about beef shank is that it’s known for being inexpensive. Often overlooked, the beef shank is an old-school cut that is perfect for low and slow-braising recipes. But its also tough, full of connective tissue and requires effort to enjoy.
Because the volcano cut (thor’s hammer) is coming into popularity, they are more expensive than a classic beef shank. It also requires the butcher to trim the meat back from the shank, so you’re paying for looks here. However, any recipe you see for Thor’s hammer cut, will also work with traditional shanks.

What is beef shank best for?

This popular meat cut is notably used for soups and hearty stews. It’s commonly used when making beef bone broth. And, as this delicious braised beef shank recipe will attest, it’s amazing braised in a Dutch oven.

MORE DELICIOUS BRAISED BEEF RECIPES

Take tough cuts and turn them into tender delicious morsels with these timeless recipe ideas

I hope you enjoy this flavorful Bone in beef shank recipe. If you’ve never made it before, let me know how it went for you in the comments below. If you have, rate the recipe and let us know in the comments below, how did it compare to other recipes you’ve tried? Can’t wait to hear how it turned out!

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Red Wine Braised Beef Shank Recipe

4.96 from 25 votes
Prep: 15 minutes
Cook: 3 hours
Resting Time: 10 minutes
Total: 3 hours 25 minutes
Servings: 10
A plate of roasted lamb with mashed potatoes and braised beef shank.
This hearty red wine braised beef shank uses a center cut shank that's been Frenched to expose the bone for presentation making one of the most sexy savory meals you've ever tasted.

Ingredients  

For the braised beef shank

  • 4.5 lb Bone-in beef shank also known as Thors Hammer, Volcano cut beef shank, where the bone has been trimmed and exposed.
  • 1 tbsp Salt
  • 3 Carrots roughly chopped
  • 1 Onion roughly chopped
  • 7 Garlic cloves minced
  • 1 tsp Pepper
  • 1 tbsp GirlCarnivore Over Easy
  • 2 tbsp tomato paste
  • 2 cups Red Wine
  • 5 to 6 thyme sprigs
  • 2 to 3 rosemary sprigs

To Garnish

  • 1 tsp Parsley minced
  • 1/2 tsp lemon zest
  • 1/2 tsp minced thyme
  • salt and pepper

Instructions 

Prep the Oven

  • Lower the oven rack to the lower mid level and preheat the oven to 300 degrees F.

Prep the beef shank:

  • If the shank has excessive fat or exposed silver skin, trim it as needed. Secure with butcher’s twine along the circumference of the shank to help it retain it’s shape and not fall apart while cooking.
  • Season the beef liberally on all sides with salt.
  • Preheat a large dutch oven over medium heat and add canola oil to the pot.
  • Place the beef shank in and sear on all sides, using tongs to rotate the shank as needed. About 7 to 10 minutes.
  • Set aside.
  • Reduce the heat to medium and add carrots, onion, garlic, tomato paste, salt, and GirlCarnivore Over Easy spice blend to the pan.
  • Deglaze the pan by pouring a little wine in, using caution as it will bubble and steam at this point. Using a wooden spoon, scrape up any browned bits on the bottom. Slowly add the remaining wine and bring to a simmer.
  • Tie the rosemary and thyme sprigs together and add them to the pot.
  • Remove from heat.

Braise the beef shank:

  • Add shank back to pot. Because of the long bone, it may protrude from the pot. Consider wrapping the bone in foil to prevent over-browning. If the lid of your Dutch Oven wont fit with the beef bone, tent the whole thing with foil to cover.
  • Cook for 2 to 3 hours, covered, until the meat reaches an internal temperature of 195 degrees F, occasionally rotating the meat to evenly cook all sides and basting it with the red wine sauce.

Rest and Serve:

  • Carefully remove the pot from the oven and using tongs, set the beef shank on a cutting board, tenting with foil to rest.
  • Carefully remove the rosemary and thyme from the red wine sauce. Shred the beef from the bone and ladle the red wine sauce over top, or serve large chunks individually with a knife and fork to allow individuals to cut.
  • Garnish with a pinch of fresh thyme sprigs, lemon zest, salt, and freshly ground black pepper to serve.

Notes

This beef shank is wonderful paired with classic polenta, creamy mashed potatoes, or risotto. To keep it keto, we served it with roasted parsnip or cauliflower puree.
When the beef is resting, you can add additional blanched carrots to the sauce, if needed, brighter color and texture for serving.
This recipe works with traditional cross cut shanks, oxtails, and traditional osso buco cut as well. 
We recommend a digital meat thermometer to check the internal temp of the meat to make sure it has cooked properly. 
If the bone is too tall for your Dutch oven, tent the lid with foil as it cooks. 

Nutrition

Serving: 1g | Calories: 220kcal | Carbohydrates: 7g | Protein: 27g | Fat: 5g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.2g | Monounsaturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 48mg | Sodium: 816mg | Potassium: 676mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 3164IU | Vitamin C: 4mg | Calcium: 70mg | Iron: 4mg
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: French
Author: Kita Roberts

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Kita is a multi-talented individual, boasting numerous accomplishments such as being an award-winning recipe developer, world-traveled professional photographer, and journalist. As the lead creative force behind Girl Carnivore®, she is widely recognized as an authority on all things meat.

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4.96 from 25 votes (19 ratings without comment)

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Comments

  1. 5 stars
    I had 2 shanks in a cast iron tray with thick foil over the top and it needed about 6 hrs to get to the temperature target. Stalled at 85C for over an hour. Maybe the lack of a solid lid lengthened the time needed. It was worth the wait though. Delicious.

  2. 5 stars
    Delicious! We cooked it for 5 hours, and added half beef stock / half wine instead of two cups only of wine. A cup of red lentils too, it was fantastic. Huge hit with all the family.

  3. 5 stars
    This was truly a phenomenal dinner, so incredibly flavorful! It was actually my first time cooking beef shanks; used 2 lovely regular cuts and they turned out perfect. The recipe is a keeper, most excellent for a wintry day here in Idaho.

  4. I’ve been trying to find a recipe for cooking beef shanks low and slow IN THE OVEN. In your article, you said to cook them at 200 to 205. Can I just throw them in the oven at that temperature? How long show I let it sit for in the oven at that temp? Thank you. Please help!

    1. Hi Annie, Cook the beef shanks to an internal temperature of 200 degrees F; this is when it gets fall apart tender. A digital meat thermometer is the best way to quickly and accurately check the temp of your meat as you’re cooking it.
      Per the recipe card, we suggest setting your oven temperature to 300 degrees F.
      Good luck

  5. 5 stars
    I could not find the full shank, only slices…so I did not have the presentation but I had the flavor! Fantastic dinner, husband was very impressed! He is still in love with the Smoked Brie but this is a solid #2.

  6. 5 stars
    Looks fantastic, chef!
    Let me guess… You’re a bone marrow girl? No, I’m not being cheeky. Nothing better than marrow spread on toast rounds

    1. 4 stars
      This was really tasty. The reason I gave a 4 star rather than a 5 is that the cooking time was way off. It had been cooking for over 4 hours and still wasn’t done. Nevertheless, I would definitely make this again, just account for more cooking time.