This show-stopping recipe for smoked rack of pork looks far more complicated than it is. Slice into a beautiful bone-in pork roast seasoned and smoked to perfection for juicy, tender slices perfect for the holidays or when you want to show off your cooking skills.

A plate of smoked pork and green beans on a wooden table.

Want to make a show-stopping smoked rack of pork?

Our recipe for smoked rack of pork recipe delivers incredibly moist, fall-off-the-bone pork with an unbelievable depth of flavor. Much like our favorite roast rack of pork, this recipe is a great way to impress your guests for the holiday season.

We start with Kurobuta pork, known as the “Wagyu of Pork”, which produces the most tender, well-marbled racks that soak up smoke beautifully. But don’t worry, this recipe works with any bone-in rack of pork.

With just a simple garlic seasoning, the pork’s flavor shines. We give pro tips for smoking it to the perfect doneness without drying out this premium cut. We give simple tips on how you can achieve a gorgeous smoke ring on a Traeger, charcoal, or gas grill and deliver irresistibly tender meat that will have everyone begging for the recipe.

A rack of pork on a black tray.

The Cut: What is a rack of pork

Rack of pork is a bone-in pork roast. Cut from the loin area of the animal and is the same as a pork loin roast, just with the bones left on for presentation or individual bone-in pork chops. This is a lean cut of pork, so cooking it to a perfect 145 degrees F is the target for juicy slices.

With a rack of pork, the bones are frenched, when the meat is cut back from the top inch or so to expose the rib bones for presentation, giving you the option of a more affordable picture-worthy bone-in roast for the holidays or special occasions.

For this roast, we used Kurobuta from Snake River Farms, to splurge for the holidays. Kurobuta is a breed of heritage pork from Japan. This cut of meat has a deeper red color and a thicker fat cap than standard pork, adding to the tenderness (if you want serious indulgence, try this for your next porchetta).

You can order a rack of pork online from our favorite purveyors, or ask your local butcher to cut this rack of pork for you. You won’t often see bone-in rack of pork at your local market, but you may be able to request it.

A bone-in pork roast on a tray on a black tiled table.

Ingredients

  • Bone-In rack of pork – we use a Kurobuta rack of pork for this recipe, but feel free to use any bone-in rack of pork. If ordering it from your butcher, ask them to leave a decent fat cap on the pork for added flavor.
  • Mustard – old-school yellow mustard
  • Kosher Salt
  • Garlic seasoning – we love Garlic Junkie from ThisJewCanQue or a garlic-forward steak seasoning like Jack Daniel’s Steak Seasoning. Alternatively, use your favorite BBQ dry rub like GirlsCanGrill Pork Rub.
  • Freshly ground black pepper
A pork roast sitting on a baking sheet to show the red color from the smoker.

How to smoke a rack of pork

  • Start by removing the rack of pork from the packaging and making sure that it’s completely thawed.
  • Score the fat cap with a sharp knife in a cross-hatch pattern and season the entire roast with a liberal coating of salt. Place it on a wire rack and let it dry brine in the fridge overnight or for up to 24 hours.
  • When ready to cook, remove the pork roast from the fridge and slather all sides in mustard. Then, apply a thick coating of the garlic seasoning. Let the roast sit at room temperature for 45 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, prep your Traeger grill or pellet smoker for 250 degrees F. We love Jack Daniel’s Charcoal Pellets for more of a grilled flavor when using our pellet grill.
  • When the grill has preheated, place the rack of pork, bone side down on the grill grate and close the lid. Allow the grill to smoke for 2 to 2 1/2 hours until the internal temperature at the thickest part reaches 140 degrees F with a digital meat thermometer.
  • Using long tongs, carefully transfer the pork roast to a cutting board or baking sheet to rest. Tent it with foil and let the meat rest for 10 to 15 minutes before serving.
  • Carve the bone-in pork rib roast by slicing between the bones with a sharp chef’s or carving knife. Sprinkle each piece with a pinch of salt, freshly ground black pepper, and some freshly minced parsley for a pop of color when serving.

Girl Carnivore Expert Recipe Tips

According to the USDA, pork is safe to eat at 145 degrees F. We pull our roast from the heat at 140 degrees and let it rest while the carryover cooking lets it come to an internal temperature of 145°F before serving.

On a Gas Grill

  • To smoke on a gas grill, preheat the grill and clean and oil the grill grates. Turn 2 of the 4 (or 1 of the 3) burners off and close the lid to allow the grill to reach 225-250. If smoking on a gas grill, add dry wood chips to a smoker box or foil packet, place it over the direct heat (the hot side of the grill), and allow them to start smoking while the grill preheats. Replace the wood chips every 30 to 45 minutes.
  • Add the rack of pork to the grill, bone-side down, on the cooler side of the grill, and close the lid. Let the pork cook as instructed in the recipe card, until it reaches an internal temperature of 140 degrees F.

On a Charcoal Grill

  • Set up your charcoal grill for a two-zone fire by arranging lit coals to one side of the grill. Add a foil pan with water to the cooler side of the grill and place the grill grates over the top. Cover the grill with the lid and adjust the air vents, allowing the grill to preheat to 225 to 250°F. If you’re adding smoking wood, add it now while the grill preheats and allow the smoke to burn clean before adding the pork.
  • When ready to cook, place the bone-in pork loin roast, fat side up, on the cooler side of the grill, over indirect heat. Cover the grill with the lid and allow it to smoke, checking on it occasionally or using a probe and ambient temperature thermometer to maintain an even heat until the pork reaches 140 degrees F internally.
  • For ceramic-style grills like a Big Green Egg, Kamado Joe, or Primo Ceramic grill, we recommend using the defuser place to keep the pork from overcooking too close to the heat.
  • You can use lump charcoal and get enough smoke flavor for a perfect centerpiece, but we recommend cherry wood for that perfect smoke ring and deep color or apple wood or pecan for a milder flavor.
A man is holding a smoked rack of pork on a tray.

What to serve with this rack of pork recipe

Creamed leeks make a perfect side dish recipe for this smoked pork recipe. Try smoked mac and cheese, smoked Brussels sprouts, caramelized smoked cabbage, or a hearty baked potato to round out the meal.

Wine Pairing

Because of the robust meaty flavor of Kurobuta pork, you can pair this rack of pork with a red wine like a richer Pinot Noir or even a Malbec or Zinfandel. If you’d prefer white wine, feel free to pair it with an oaky and dry Sauvignon Blanc.

A platter of smoked rack of pork and mashed potatoes on a wooden table.

Leftovers and Reheating

Wrap any leftover pork tightly in foil and store in the fridge for up to 4 days.

To reheat, slice off what you need and wrap it in foil. Preheat an oven to 325 degrees F and place the foil-wrapped pork in the oven for about 10-15 minutes until heated through.

If using a leaner rack of pork, consider adding some compound butter or infused oil when reheating the pork for added moisture and flavor.

Smoked rack of pork on a platter with rosemary and veggies.

More amazing Roast recipes

Roll up your sleeves and get ready to show off your skills with this deceptively easy smoked rack of pork recipe. It’ll be on your menu for years to come.

Have you tried this recipe? Do us a favor and rate the recipe card with the  ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ and drop a comment to help out the next reader.

Save This Recipe ✉️

Enter your email below, and I’ll send this recipe straight to your inbox.

Plus, I’ll send you great new recipes fresh outta the oven.

Please enable JavaScript in your browser to complete this form.

Smoked Rack of Pork

5 from 22 votes
Prep: 10 minutes
Cook: 2 hours 30 minutes
Resting Time: 10 minutes
Total: 2 hours 50 minutes
Servings: 12
A plate of smoked pork with mashed potatoes and green beans on a wooden table.
This is the best and easiest way to cook a rack of pork – simply smoked low and slow to infuse insane flavor into the meat, and juicy, tender slices. Crazy moist and packed with flavor in every slice!

Ingredients  

  • 7 lbs Bone-In rack of pork
  • 2 tbsp Mustard
  • 1 tsp Kosher Salt
  • 2 – 4 tbsp Garlic seasoning Garlic Junkie, Jack Daniel’s Steak Seasoning or GirlsCanGrill Pork Rub
  • Black pepper for garnish

Instructions 

Prep the Pork:

  • Remove the pork from the package and pat it dry with paper towels.
  • Score the fat cap with a sharp knife and season the whole roast liberally with salt.
  • Place the rack of pork on a wire rack, over a baking sheet and let it air dry in the refrigerator over night for 8 to 24 hours.

Smoke the Rack of Pork

  • When ready to cook, remove the pork from the fridge and coat all sides in mustard.
  • Apply a thick coating of the garlic seasoning and let the pork sit on at room temperature for 45 minutes. =
  • Meanwhile, prep the grill by filling the auger with pellets and setting it to 250 degrees F.
  • When the grill is preheated, place the rack of pork on the grill grates, bone side down and close the lid.
  • Let the pork smoke for 2 to 2 1/2 hours until the until the internal temperature at the thickest part reaches 140 degrees F with a digital meat thermometer.

Rest and serve

  • Using long tongs, carefully transfer the pork roast to a cutting board or baking sheet to rest.
  • Tent it with foil and let the meat rest for 10 to 15 minutes before serving.
  • Carve the bone-in pork rib roast by slicing between the bones with a sharp chef’s or carving knife.
  • Serve with a pinch of salt, pepper and freshly minced parsley, if desired.

Notes

We recommend Jack Daniel’s charcoal pellets for great barbecue flavor on our Traeger grill
For the best results, the internal temperature of the pork should be 145 degrees F when slicing and serving, according to the USDA. 

ON A GAS GRILL

  • To smoke on a gas grill, preheat the grill and clean and oil the grill grates. Turn 2 of the 4 (or 1 of the 3) burners off and close the lid to allow the grill to reach 225-250. If smoking on a gas grill, add dry wood chips to a smoker box or foil packet and place it over the direct heat, the hot side of the grill, and allow them to start smoking while the grill preheats. replace the wood chips every 30 to 45 minutes.
  • Add the rack of pork to the grill, bone-side down, on the cooler side of the grill, and close the lid. Let the pork cook as instructed in the recipe card, until it reaches an internal temperature of 140 degrees F.

ON A CHARCOAL GRILL

  • Set up your charcoal grill for a two-zone fire by arranging lit coals to one side of the grill. Add a foil pan with water to the cooler side of the grill and place the grill grates over the top. Cover the grill with the lid and adjust the air vents, allowing the grill to preheat to 225 to 250°F. If you’re adding smoking wood, add it now while the grill preheats and allow the smoke to burn clean before adding the pork.
  • When ready to cook, place the bone-in pork loin roast, fat side up, on the cooler side of the grill, over indirect heat. Cover the grill with the lid and allow it to smoke, checking on it occasionally or using a probe and ambient temperature thermometer to maintain an even heat until the pork reaches 140 degrees F internally.
  • For ceramic-style grills like a Big Green Egg, Kamado Joe, or Primo Ceramic grill, we recommend using the defuser place to keep the pork from overcooking too close to the heat.
  • You can use lump charcoal and get enough smoke flavor for a perfect centerpiece, but we recommend cherry wood for that perfect smoke ring and deep color or apple wood or pecan for a milder flavor.

Nutrition

Serving: 1g | Calories: 357kcal | Carbohydrates: 2g | Protein: 60g | Fat: 11g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 4g | Cholesterol: 167mg | Sodium: 352mg | Potassium: 1024mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 0.1g | Vitamin A: 44IU | Vitamin C: 0.1mg | Calcium: 54mg | Iron: 2mg
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: American
Author: Kita Roberts

Bookmark this recipe now!

Save Recipe Bookmark

Categories: , , , ,

Well, Hey, Y’all.

Kita is a multi-talented individual, boasting numerous accomplishments such as being an award-winning recipe developer, world-traveled professional photographer, and journalist. As the lead creative force behind Girl Carnivore®, she is widely recognized as an authority on all things meat.

SUBSCRIBE!

Signup and get free recipes sent to your inbox every week!

Please enable JavaScript in your browser to complete this form.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe Rating