Impress your guests with this mouth-watering stuffed breast of veal recipe. This savory and satisfying classic recipe may be your new favorite indulgent meal, perfect for holidays or special occasions. 

Sliced cooked stuffed veal breast to show spinach filling.

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This post was sponsored by Veal – Discover Delicious, funded by the Beef Farmers and Ranchers, but all opinions are my own.

When you think of veal recipes, you think of timeless cuts in classic Italian or European kitchens. Slow-braised dishes grandma would make for big family dinners and Sunday Suppers. But this underused protein isn’t just for grandma’s cookbook, the breast of veal is an impressive dish with incredible flavors that are begging to be the main course for special occasions and get-togethers. This is one of those great recipes that would make grandma proud. 

Breast of veal to show the cut, fat side down.

The Cut: Breast of Veal 

Veal breast is the brisket and plate area, similar to the brisket on a cow. It’s a fatty cut of red meat from a heavily worked part of the animal, but it also has a mildly richer flavor, which is unique for veal recipes. It’s served by slow braising or roasting to allow the low steady heat to break down the connective tissue for tender, succulent results. Unlike our grilled veal chops or veal cutlets, this dish takes a little longer but has an amazing richness of flavor. 

Whole breast of veal is an uncommon cut, depending on where you are in the country, and it’s best to contact your local butcher if you can’t find it near you. It is often sold with the bones, but feel free to ask the butcher to debone it for you and keep the bones for making veal stock. You can also request the butcher add a pocket for stuffing. 

We omitted the pocket for this stuffed breast of veal recipe to keep this as approachable as possible for everyone. From novice cooks to seasoned chefs, everyone can master this incredibly stuffed breast of veal!

Ingredients for the veal breast recipe.

Ingredients for stuffed veal breast

For the Filling: 

  • Spinach – use fresh raw baby spinach.
  • Garlic cloves
  • Pork panko – or traditional panko.
  • Parmesan – freshly grated.
  • Salt and pepper – we always use kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper when cooking.
  • Lemon zest

For the braised veal: 

  • Proscuitto 
  • Breast of veal – you may need to order this cut from a butcher shop. Be sure to give yourself at least a week for it to arrive on time. We received ours from Marcho Farms
  • Oil – we use canola oil or avocado oil. Use your favorite neutral cooking oil.
  • White White – use a dry white wine you would also enjoy drinking.
  • Onion, Carrot, & Celery 
  • Fresh Rosemary, Thyme, tarragon, and sage
  • Chicken broth – unless you have veal stock on hand, in which case, use that. 
  • Garlic compound butter 
  • Gremolata 
  • Parsley
  • Garlic 
  • Lemon zest 

Note: If keeping this kosher, omit the prosciutto and use traditional bread crumbs.

How to cook Breast of Veal 

This recipe has multiple steps and looks like a lot of work, but if you prepare your mise en place and have everything ready to go, it comes together quickly. This includes cutting kitchen twine lengths to help tie the roast off when rolled. 

Make the Filling

  • Start by balancing the spinach in boiling water for 1 minute. Then, strain it and let it cool over a colander. 
  • When the spinach is cool enough to handle, squeeze the liquid out. You can do this by squeezing the spinach between clean kitchen towels, rolling and rerolling to remove the excess liquid, or using your hands. 
  • Once the spinach has been pretty well wrung out, add it to a food processor with the garlic, panko, parmesan cheese, salt, pepper, and lemon zest. Pulse 4 to 5 times to combine. 
Spinach being blanched in a pot of hot water.

Prep the Veal

  • Arrange the boneless veal breast on a clean work surface and trim any loose fat or debone if needed. Pound out the veal so it’s an even thickness from edge to edge. 

Stuff and Roll the Breast of Veal

  • Season the veal with salt and pepper and place the fat side down.
  • Arrange the prosciutto over the veal in a single layer, with just the edges overlapping. 
  • Next, spoon the spinach filling over the entire surface, leaving a 1-inch edge along the long edge.
  • Starting with the long edge, working with both hands, tightly roll the breast of the veal, using your thumbs to keep the filling pushed in as you roll it. 
  • Secure the veal roll every one to two inches with butcher’s twine, folding the edges under to wrap over themselves if needed. 

Sear

  • Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F and adjust the cooking rack to the lower middle rack. 
  • Heat a large Dutch oven or cast iron skillet over medium-high heat. Add the oil and swirl to coat the surface. 
  • When the oil just starts to smoke, add the roast, seam side up, and brown on all sides, 3 – 4 minutes a side. 
  • Transfer the roast to a clean work surface and then reduce the heat to medium. Slowly add in the wine; it will bubble and steam. Then, using a wooden spoon, deglaze the pan by scraping up any browned bits stuck to the bottom and remove the pan from the heat. 
  • Transfer the onions, celery, and carrots to the bottom of the pan and make a bouquet garni by tying the herbs with a short length of kitchen twine (this helps retrieve them later). If you’re using a different roasting pan than what you seared in, transfer the wine reduction as well. 
  • Nestle the stuffed breast of veal back into the pot, seam side down, and pour the chicken broth in as well. You want the broth to be about halfway up the sides of the roast. Add more liquid if needed.
  • Cover with the lid or a double layer of aluminum foil. 

Braise 

  • Transfer the Dutch oven or roasting pan to the oven and close the door. Braise the veal for 1 ½ hours, basting every 20 minutes with the liquid in the pan, adding more chicken broth if the liquid gets low. 
  • Carefully remove the pan from the oven and increase the heat to 400 °F. Remove the lid or foil and return the pot to the hot oven. Allow the breast of veal to roast for another 45 or so minutes, still basting every 20 minutes. Cook until the internal temperature reaches 165 degrees F. 

Rest & Reduce

  • When the meat has reached 165F, remove the pan from the oven and transfer the roast to a cutting board to cool. Rub a few dollops of Garlic compound butter over the top of the veal roast and tent it with foil to rest. 
  • Carefully strain the braising liquid from the Dutch oven to a clean pan. Bring to a rolling boil and then reduce the heat to medium and allow the liquid to simmer until reduced by half, about 10 minutes. After it cools, skim off any excess fat that congeals on the surface with a fine wire mesh strainer. 
  • Meanwhile, make the gremolata by mixing the minced parsley, garlic, and lemon zest in a small bowl. 
Liquid being reduced in the Dutch oven.
Reduce the flavorful liquid to serve alongside the roast.

Slice and Serve

  • To serve, slice the stuffed veal with a sharp carving knife into ¾ to 1″ medallions, snipping the kitchen twine as needed for plating. 
  • Plate the slices of veal breast hot with your favorite sides, a small ramekin of the reduced juices, and a sprinkle of the gremolata, and enjoy. 
Golden brown rolled veal roast thats sliced for serving.

Girl Carnivore EXPERT TIPS

  • Use long grilling tongs and a large, heavy-duty spatula to help maneuver the roast when searing.
  • If you have veal stock, we recommend using it instead of chicken stock for a richer flavor. 
  • It’s essential to use a quality digital meat thermometer to measure this roast’s internal temperature accurately. Because it’s rolled, you want to ensure the probe touches the meat and not the spinach filling when checking the temperature.
  • You can mix Swiss chard in with your spinach stuffing mixture. Be sure to remove the chard stems before blanching to omit the bitterness. 
  • If you know your family can handle the heat, also add a teaspoon of red pepper flakes to the spinach filling for a little heat. 

What to Serve with 

Good side dishes to serve with stuffed breast of veal are some of our favorites, like roasted or mashed potatoes or pureed turnips and steamed or roasted vegetables such as peas, carrots, and green beans. Or try smoked Brussels sprouts, a simple green salad, rice, or risotto.

Wine Pairing:

Veal can be enjoyed with either red or white wine. Pair this with a crisp, dry white wine for serving like Pinot Grigio, Pinot Gris, Sauvignon Blanc, or a light Pinot Noir if you prefer red.

Overhead of roasted veal dinner with side dishes like carrots, peas and mashed parsnips.

Leftovers and Reheating

Store leftovers in an airtight container or tightly wrapped in aluminum foil for up to 3 days. Slice off and reheat in an oven preheated to 325 degrees F until heated through, about 10 minutes.

Cooked stuffed breast of veal can be frozen for up to 3 months. To reheat, thaw it in the refrigerator overnight, then reheat in a 325°F (163°C) oven, covered with foil, until warmed through.

More delicious veal recipes

Stuffed Breast of Veal

5 from 19 votes
Prep: 20 minutes
Cook: 2 hours
Resting Time: 15 minutes
Total: 2 hours 35 minutes
Servings: 10
A classic stuffed breast of veal recipe with herbs and breadcrumbs rolled and braised for layers of succulent flavors and tender meat alla fornara.

Ingredients  

Filling:

  • 4-5 cups Spinach
  • 4 Garlic cloves
  • 1 cup Pork panko or traditional panko
  • 1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
  • 1 tsp Salt
  • ½ tsp pepper
  • 1 tsp Lemon zest

For the braised veal:

  • 4 oz Proscuitto
  • 4 lbs Breast of veal
  • 2 tbsp Oil
  • 1 ½ cup White White we use a dry white wine
  • 1 Onion roughly diced
  • 2 carrots roughly diced
  • 2 celery stalks roughly diced
  • 2 springs Rosemary
  • 5 sprigs Thyme
  • 2 sprigs Tarragon
  • 2 – 3 cups Chicken broth
  • 4 tbsp garlic compound butter

Gremolata

  • ¼ cup Parsley minced
  • 4 Garlic cloves grated
  • 1-2 tsp Lemon zest

Instructions 

Prep the filling:

  • Blanch the spinach and set aside over a colander to cool.
  • Drain the spinach by squeezing out as much water as possible.
  • Saute the garlic for 30 seconds.
  • Mix the spinach, garlic, parmesan, and lemon zest with salt and pepper and pulse in a food processor.
  • Add the pork panko and mix to combine.

Prep the Veal:

  • Preheat the oven to 300 degrees F.
  • Adjust the cooking rack to the lower middle rack.
  • Arrange the breast of the veal on a clean work surface. Trim, if needed, any excess fat or bones.
  • Pound with a meat mallet if needed to create an even work surface.
  • Season the veal liberally with salt and pepper.
  • With the fat side down, lay the prosciutto over the veal.
  • Spoon the spinach filling evenly on the veal, leaving an inch at the long edge for rolling.
  • Tightly roll the veal towards the exposed edge and secure it with butchers twice every inch or so.

Sear the Veal:

  • Preheat a large dutch oven or cast iron skillet over medium heat. Swirl the oil in the pan to coat it.
  • When hot, add the veal and brown on all sides, 2 to 3 minutes per side.
  • Transfer the breast of the veal to a cutting board.
  • Deglaze the pan with the white wine.
  • If using a dutch oven, remove from heat and add the onion, celery and carrots. If using a baking dish, transfer the liquid to the dish and add the onions, celery, and carrots now.
  • Tie the herbs together and add them as well.
  • Pour the chicken stock in and nestle the veal back into the pot seam side down.
  • Cover with the lid and place in the preheated oven.

Braise:

  • Braise the veal for 1 ½ hours, basting every 20 minutes or so with the lid on, until the veal reaches an internal temperature of 150 degrees F. Add more stock if needed to keep the veal covered about halfway up the sides.
  • Remove the veal from the oven. Increase the temperature to 400 degrees F.
  • Carefully remove the lid and slice the roast back into the oven uncovered.
  • Roast the breast of the veal for another 30 to 45 minutes to brown the outside.
  • The veal is done when it reaches an internal temperature of 165 degrees F.

Rest:

  • Remove the veal from the oven and transfer to a cutting board.
  • Place a few dollops of the garlic compound butter on top of the veal with the garlic compound butter. Tent with foil to rest.

Reduce the liquid:

  • Meanwhile, strain the cooking liquid and return to the dutch oven. Skim off any fat from the surface with a mesh strainer.
  • Bring the liquid to a rolling boil over medium-high heat on the stovetop.
  • Reduce the heat and allow the liquid to simmer until reduced by half.

Make the gremolata

  • In a small bowl, use your fingers to pinch the parsley, garlic, and lemon zest together and mix to make the gremolata.

Serve:

  • After 15 minutes, remove the butcher’s twine from the veal and slice it into portions about ½ inch thick to serve.
  • Plate the veal and serve with the reduction and a sprinkle of the gremolata.

Video

Notes

  • Use long grilling tongs and a large, heavy-duty spatula to help maneuver the roast when searing.
  • If you have veal stock, we recommend using it instead of chicken stock for a richer flavor. 
  • It’s essential to use a quality digital meat thermometer to measure this roast’s internal temperature accurately. Because it’s rolled, you want to ensure the probe touches the meat and not the spinach filling when checking the temperature.
  • You can mix Swiss chard in with your spinach stuffing mixture. Be sure to remove the chard stems before blanching to omit the bitterness. 
  • If you know your family can handle the heat, also add a teaspoon of red pepper flakes to the spinach filling for a little heat. 

Nutrition

Serving: 1g | Calories: 562kcal | Carbohydrates: 18g | Protein: 41g | Fat: 33g | Saturated Fat: 14g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 3g | Monounsaturated Fat: 12g | Trans Fat: 0.2g | Cholesterol: 176mg | Sodium: 919mg | Potassium: 773mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 3556IU | Vitamin C: 9mg | Calcium: 186mg | Iron: 2mg
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Italian
Author: Kita Roberts

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Recipe FAQs

What should the internal temperature of the stuffed veal be?

The USDA recommends veal be cooked to 145 degrees F; however, due to the fat content of this cut, we took it to 165 °F and then rested it to 170 degrees F before slicing and serving. When checking the internal temperature of stuffed meat, make sure the temperature probe is inserted in the thickest part of the meat to get the most accurate reading. 

What cooking methods are best for stuffed breasts of veal?

The most common cooking methods for the breast of veal recipes are roasting or braising. Roasting provides a crispy exterior, while braising keeps the meat tender and moist. This recipe uses both techniques to get tender meat with a beautiful golden brown crust. 

How long does it take to cook a stuffed breast of veal?

Cooking times for a stuffed breast of veal can vary depending on the size and thickness, but it generally takes about 1.5 to 2.5 hours at 300°F for roasting or until the internal temperature reaches 160°F.

Can I prepare the stuffed breast of veal in advance and cook it later?

You can prepare the stuffed breast of veal in advance and store it in the refrigerator for up to a day before cooking. Make sure to cover it well with plastic wrap to prevent cross-contamination and maintain freshness. 

Can I prepare the stuffed breast of veal in advance and cook it later?

In Pat Lafridas’s book, Meat, he mentions his grandmother cooking a stuffed breast of veal and serving it hours later for unexpected guests by simply having it ready to reheat. We’re keeping this trick in our playbook. 

Sources

Meat: A Kitchen Education” by James Peterson 
Meat: Everything You Need to Know” by Pat LaFrieda
Butchering Beef: The Comprehensive Photographic Guide to Humane Slaughtering and Butchering” by Adam Danforth
The Ultimate Companion to Meat: On the Farm, At the Butcher, In the Kitchen” by Anthony Puharich
“Prep and Temp” via Veal.org https://www.veal.org/cooking/prep-and-temp/
“Cooking Meat: Is It Done Yet?” via USDA.gov https://www.usda.gov/media/blog/2022/10/03/cooking-meat-it-done-yet

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Well, Hey, Y’all.

Kita is a multi-talented individual, boasting numerous accomplishments such as being an award-winning recipe developer, world-traveled professional photographer, and journalist. As the lead creative force behind Girl Carnivore®, she is widely recognized as an authority on all things meat.

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5 from 19 votes (19 ratings without comment)

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